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Artistic and cultural relations between the British Isles, Ireland and the Near East in the Early Middle Ages

Study Day on Wednesday 10th October 2018 at 10:00AM

Lecturer: Michelle Brown
Venue: Bishopswood Village Hall

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In these three illustrated presentations we will be taken on a journey, with illuminated medieval manuscripts and artistic media, from the Atlantic seaboard to the Holy Land and back again. We will examine the different cultures present in the islands and their points of reference in the near east and set their art within their own historical context. The conventional historical view has been that there was little if any direct contact between these areas from the demise of the western Roman Empire until the Crusades, but new research and finds (notably Michelle's own work at St Catherine's Monastery, Sinai) are presenting a different, exciting view of just how small a world it actually was, even then. She will also consider the way in which the art of this period has influenced the history of art in general from the Carolingian renaissance to the Arts and Crafts movement.

Michelle Brown is a leading expert and consultant in Manuscript Studies and Medieval history and the former Curator of Illuminated Manuscripts at the British Library. She is Professor Emerita of Medieval Manuscript Studies at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, and Visiting Professor at University College London and Baylor University, Texas. She has written over 30 books and 90 articles and lectured and broadcast widely on manuscripts and cultural history. Recent publications include The Book of the Transformation of Britain, c.550-1050 (2011) and Art of the Islands: Celtic, Pictish and Anglo-Saxon Visual Culture (Bodleian 2016).

Cost: £35 including tea/coffee and lunch
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